FLY's A-Z

ACCOMMODATION

The eyes lens changing shape to focus on near objects. Our ability to accomodate starts to decrease around 40 years of age.

ADD

The extra magnification needed to see close objects.

AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION (AMD)

A condition which causes deterioration to the central vision.

AMBLYOPIA/ LAZY EYE 

Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is a vision development disorder from infancy and early childhood in which normally one eye fails to achieve better vision, even with prescription glasses or contact lenses. If picked up at an early age it may be manageable.

ANTI-REFLECTIVE COATING

A coating applied to the surface of lenses to help reduce  glare/reflections.

ANTI-SMUDGE COATING 

All the benefits of the anti reflective coating,  helping to reduce glare/reflections but with the added benefit of anti smudge technology. Keeping your glasses cleaner.

ASTIGMATISM

Where the eye needs different powers of correction over opposite angles in the eye. Often caused by the front window of the eye (cornea) not being spherical and shaping more towards a rugby ball. 

AXIS

You’ll find this on your prescription next to your cylinder. This tells us what angle to place the cylinder power in your lens. 

BASE 

Base comes after a Prism, it normally indicates the direction the prism will be placed in you glasses. This can either be UP, DOWN, IN or OUT.

BASE CURVE

Usually referring to contact lenses, the ‘base curve’  is the curvature of the inside surface of you contact lens.

BIFOCAL

A spectacle lens with an extra segment usually towards the base of the lens to incorporate more magnification to see close up.

BLEPHARITIS

A common condition causing inflammation of the eyelid margins. 

BLUE FILTER COATING

This is a protective coating that reduces the blue light emitted by digital screens. Long exposure can lead to eye strain, eye fatigue and even sleeplessness. Our coating helps contribute towards a more relaxed and comfortable vision when using these digital devices. 

CATARACT

A clouding of the human lens.  Usually occurs slowly and most commonly due to ageing.

CORNEA

The transparent, front window the eye.

CONJUNCTIVITIS

A common condition causing inflammation at the front of the eye. It usually heals without treatment after a week. Sometimes referred to as pink eye.

CONVERGENCE

The eyes movement towards each other when looking at a close object.

CRYSTALLINE LENS

The lens inside the eye which aids in focusing light onto the back of the eye.

CYLINDER

A lens needed to correct astigmatism. 

CHROMATIC ABERRATION 

Light rays will bend to varying degrees when they enter a lens. This can cause coloured fringes when looking out of your glasses.

This principle applies to the formation of rainbows!

DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Diabetic Retinopathy is the term given to the changes in the back of the eye which is caused by diabetes. It can affect the blood vessels in the retina and if left untreated it can lead to sight loss. See our page on Diabetes for more information

DIPLOPIA

Double vision.

DILATION

Widening the pupils using eyedrops to get a better view inside your eye.

DIOPTRE

A unit of measurement for the refractive power of a lens.

DRIVING STANDARD

The law states that all drivers must be able to read a standard number plate, in good daylight, from a distance of twenty metres – with glasses or corrective lenses if required.

EYE DROPS

There are different eye drops for different purposes. These include moisturising drops, whitening drops, anti-itching drops and more. See our accessory section for more information.

FLASHES

A symptom that can be linked to visual migraines when occurred in both eyes, most commonly described as star like flashes or zigzag. Sometimes Flashes can indicate a more serious eye conditions and can be linked to a retinal detachment. 

FLOATERS 

Floaters are normal caused by age-related changes in the jelly-like substance of your eye (vitreous). Microscopic fibers within the vitreous can clump together to cast tiny shadows on your retina. The shadows you see are called floaters.

FUNDUS

The inside surface of the eye

GLAUCOMA

A group of eye diseases which cause damage to the optic nerve. See our page on Glaucoma for more information. 

HIGH-INDEX LENS

A lens material that bends light more than a standard lens material. This enables the lenses in your glasses to be thinner.

HYPEROPIA

Also referred to as long-sightedness or far-sightedness. It means you may struggle to see a closer object whereas distant objects are more focused. See our page on hyperopia for more information.

INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE 

A measurement of the fluid pressure inside your eye.  Having pressure that is too low or high can damage your eye.

IRIS

The coloured structure at the front of the eye controlling pupil size.

MACULA

Part of the eye used to detect central, detailed vision.

MYOPIA

Also referred to as short-sightedness or near-sightedness. It means you may struggle to see a distant object whereas closer objects are more focused.

NUTRITION   

A balanced diet including eating a wide variety of fruit and vegetables, including dark green leaves is not only good for your general health but also supports good eye health too. (See our eye health page for supplements that might be of interest)

OPTOMETRIST

A professional who will give out your glasses prescription/power and assess the health of your eyes.

OPHTHALMOLOGIST

A doctor specialised in the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases. 

PLANO

A lens with no power.

PRESCRIPTION

The information needed to make your glasses. See our prescription page. (add link)

POLARIZED LENS

Lenses with a special filter to allow light to pass in one direction. This reduces glare.

POLYCARBONATE

A plastic lens material with high impact resistance.

PRISM

A lens used to help correct muscle defects in the eye.

PUPIL

A hole in the front of the eye which allows light to enter. It will change size based on how much light is in your surroundings. 

PUPILLARY DISTANCE (PD)

The distance in between your pupils. This measurement allows us to ensure your eyes are centred correctly when wearing glasses.

RETINA

A light-sensitive layer at the back of your eye.

SPHERE

The lens power needed to correct short or long-sightedness. (Add link to prescription page) 

SQUINT 

An eye condition where the eye may not look straight ahead but be turned either inwards, outwards, upwards or downwards.

ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT

Part of the light spectrum that isn’t visible to a human eye. UV light exposure is harmful to the eye.